Journey’s ‘Don’t Stop Believin” Hits 1 Billion Spotify Streams

Jessica Wong

Journey’s monster 1981 hit song “Don’t Stop Believin’” has officially hit more than one billion streams on Spotify. Guitarist Neal Schon celebrated the momentous achievement on Twitter, sharing a screenshot of the band’s Spotify home page and their most popular tracks, which lists “Don’t Stop Believin’” at the top, having crossed […]

Journey’s monster 1981 hit song “Don’t Stop Believin'” has officially hit more than one billion streams on Spotify.

Guitarist Neal Schon celebrated the momentous achievement on Twitter, sharing a screenshot of the band’s Spotify home page and their most popular tracks, which lists “Don’t Stop Believin'” at the top, having crossed the one billion stream threshold.

He thanked the fans and noted, erroneously, that Queen “is the ONLY other band at this point,” apparently referencing that coveted billion stream benchmark. Schon issued a follow-up tweet, clarifying, “JOURNEY and QUEEN the Only 2 Bands to Ever Attain more then [sic] 1 Billion Streams individually for ‘Dont stop Believin’ and ‘Bohemian Rhapsody.”

Currently, Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Don’t Stop Me Now” sit over one billion streams.

Additionally, Oasis’ “Wonderwall” exceeded one billion Spotify streams in October of last year. Wikipedia also lists 100 artists who have earned one billion or more Spotify streams and states that Drake’s “One Dance” was the first song to hit that mark, which occurred on Oct. 16, 2016. Among those 100 artists are a handful on the fringe of rock — Imagine Dragons, 5 Seconds of Summer and Twenty One Pilots.

Still, “Don’t Stop Believin'” surpassing one billion streams on the popular music platform is an impressive achievement. Congratulations to Journey!

View Schon’s celebratory tweets below.

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