As COVID-19 cases in kids increase elsewhere, Hamilton County and Northern Kentucky see low rates

Jessica Wong

Before the pandemic started, a crowd of college students at the University of Cincinnati playing cornhole was anything but controversial. Now, it can spark a debate about trying to avoid COVID-19 versus staying healthy.”We want to be healthy. Honestly, that’s the best way to beat this is to be healthy […]

Before the pandemic started, a crowd of college students at the University of Cincinnati playing cornhole was anything but controversial. Now, it can spark a debate about trying to avoid COVID-19 versus staying healthy.”We want to be healthy. Honestly, that’s the best way to beat this is to be healthy and get out there and, like, get your vitamin D in and be healthy,” Patrick Wurzbacher said.A 20-year-old UC student, Wurzbacher is part of an age group that Hamilton County’s Health Commissioner Greg Kesterman is watching closely.”We are not currently seeing any particular group with any increases in COVID cases,” Kesterman said. “We are actually seeing, the highest age group right now with COVID, between 20 and 29 year-olds.”That news might make parents of pre-teen and teenage kids less anxious, especially after the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, said youth sports have led to outbreaks in young people.”We are learning that many outbreaks in young people are related to youth sports and extracurricular activities,” Walensky said.That may be the case in other parts of the country, but Kesterman said it’s not a trend showing up in Hamilton County’s COVID-19 data.”We’ll be watching these numbers very closely and trying to make sure that the public is aware of any types of increases that we do see,” Kesterman said. “Any time you allow for sports to happen it’s healthy for the kids, but it does increase some opportunity to increase chances of COVID.”Dr. Lynn Saddler, director of the Northern Kentucky Health Department, echoed Kesterman’s comments. Saddler said cases have dropped by 44% among infants to 9-year-olds in Northern Kentucky since January. For young people 10 to 19, the drop in cases has been 69%.Back at UC, Wurzbacher and his friends said they’re cautious while trying to be as carefree as possible.”Whenever we’re, like, in crowded areas or places where, like, we could put other people at risk, we’re going to put our masks on,” Wurzbacher said. “But if we’re outside with, like, the wind that we have today, the airflow that we have.. then we don’t really feel a need exactly to put our masks on.”

Before the pandemic started, a crowd of college students at the University of Cincinnati playing cornhole was anything but controversial. Now, it can spark a debate about trying to avoid COVID-19 versus staying healthy.

“We want to be healthy. Honestly, that’s the best way to beat this is to be healthy and get out there and, like, get your vitamin D in and be healthy,” Patrick Wurzbacher said.

A 20-year-old UC student, Wurzbacher is part of an age group that Hamilton County’s Health Commissioner Greg Kesterman is watching closely.

“We are not currently seeing any particular group with any increases in COVID cases,” Kesterman said. “We are actually seeing, the highest age group right now with COVID, between 20 and 29 year-olds.”

That news might make parents of pre-teen and teenage kids less anxious, especially after the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, said youth sports have led to outbreaks in young people.

“We are learning that many outbreaks in young people are related to youth sports and extracurricular activities,” Walensky said.

That may be the case in other parts of the country, but Kesterman said it’s not a trend showing up in Hamilton County’s COVID-19 data.

“We’ll be watching these numbers very closely and trying to make sure that the public is aware of any types of increases that we do see,” Kesterman said. “Any time you allow for sports to happen it’s healthy for the kids, but it does increase some opportunity to increase chances of COVID.”

Dr. Lynn Saddler, director of the Northern Kentucky Health Department, echoed Kesterman’s comments. Saddler said cases have dropped by 44% among infants to 9-year-olds in Northern Kentucky since January. For young people 10 to 19, the drop in cases has been 69%.

Back at UC, Wurzbacher and his friends said they’re cautious while trying to be as carefree as possible.

“Whenever we’re, like, in crowded areas or places where, like, we could put other people at risk, we’re going to put our masks on,” Wurzbacher said. “But if we’re outside with, like, the wind that we have today, the airflow that we have.. then we don’t really feel a need exactly to put our masks on.”

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